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  • Atlanta 2011 - Conference Format Proposal

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As discussed during the 10-27-2010 conference call, let's use this page to define the format of the Atlanta 2011 Regional conference.

Location and Time

Georgia Tech will be hosting in Atlanta, though a precise venue and dates are TBD.

Focus

The focus of this conference will be Teaching and Learning.

Attendees' Expectations

Attendees should expect an event that will:

  • focus on the use of Sakai, not on the code.
  • talk about the 'Open Academic Environment' (previously 'Sakai 3') and what it means for the use of Sakai
  • help people showcase practices and user support initiatives.
  • promote networking amongst attendees.
  • promote hands-on working sessions on real-life issues or projects.
  • starts ongoing projects that will live beyond the event.

Format

The format will be an hybrid between a formal planned conference and an unconference. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unconference for ideas of the kind of activities that could be planned.

  • Have an idea wall, similar to the "Curriculum Wall" in the movie Accepted
  • World cafe
  • Lightning talks
  • Hackathon

Length

The length of the event could wiggle between one and a half to two and a half days.

Types of Sessions

The building blocks of the event would be the following:

  • Keynote address (optional):
    • If we can find a local speaker of interest to discuss teaching and learning, fine. If not, fine too.
  • Regular community-submitted sessions:
    • To attract Faculty members to share their practices, we could have a formal vetted call for proposal focused exclusively on them.
  • Unconference sessions:
    • People would be encouraged to prepare lightning talks in advance and grab a time slot during the event to present and discuss. As topics of interest emerge during the conference, attendees would also be encouraged to grab those time slots on the fly as well.

Track and Time Usage

Depending on the length of the event, we could decide to organize our time in different ways:

1) Half a day of formal presentation, then unconference
  • Day 1: Afternoon
    • (All) Welcome
    • (All) Intro to the format, explanation of how to propose a session
    • (Breakout) Faculty practices 1
    • Break
    • (Breakout) Faculty practices 2
    • (All) Day 1 Wrapup
  • Day 2: Morning
    • (All) Presentation and adjustment of the schedule
    • (Breakout) Unconference sessions 1
    • (Breakout) Unconference sessions 2
    • Break
    • (Breakout) Unconference sessions 3
    • Lunch
    • (Breakout) Unconference sessions 4
    • (Breakout) Unconference sessions 5
    • (All) Day 2 Wrapup
2) Formal presentations as a track, unconference sessions throughout
  • Day 1: Afternoon
    • (All) Welcome
    • (All) Intro to the format, explanation of how to propose a session
    • (Track) Faculty practices + (Breakout) Unconference sessions 1
    • Break
    • (Track) Faculty practices + (Breakout) Unconference sessions 2
    • (All) Day 1 Wrapup
  • Day 2: Morning
    • (All) Presentation and adjustment of the schedule
    • (Track) Faculty practices + (Breakout) Unconference sessions 3
    • (Track) Faculty practices + (Breakout) Unconference sessions 4
    • Break
    • (Track) Faculty practices + (Breakout) Unconference sessions 5
    • Lunch
    • (Track) Faculty practices + (Breakout) Unconference sessions 6
    • (Track) Faculty practices + (Breakout) Unconference sessions 7
    • (All) Day 2 Wrapup