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Revised Definition (8-19-10)

 The following definition is a rewrite with input from Michael Feldstein and Josh Danish (TWSIA winner from Indiana):

The intent of the Teaching With Sakai Innovation Award (TWSIA) is to recognize excellence in teaching and learning.

The TWSIA committee defines an innovative course or educational experience as one that, by design, engages and challenges students, resulting in greater student interest, a deeper level of understanding and/or a lasting change in the students' perception of an issue or topic.

The innovative method, practice or strategy used may not be new in the world, but its implementation may be out of the ordinary in your field of practice or new to you. It is more than simply using new technologies; rather it is an approach to teaching and learning that results in a much-enhanced, even transformative, educational experience for students. 

Committee discussion 8-16-10

Latest version:

The TWSIA committee defines innovation in education as an approach to teaching and learning that results in a transformative educational experience for students.
 
Innovation occurs by design by using methods, practices, and techniques, often beyond the use of a new tool or technology, and above and beyond normal pedagogical practices, resulting in teaching and learning excellence.

It is the use of the "innovation" that leads to greater student engagement and interest, a  deeper level of understanding and a lasting change in perception of an issue or topic. The innovative technique may not be new  in the world, but its implementation may be out of the ordinary in your field of practice or novel to you (to the instructor, instructional designer, etc)."

*note that eligibility for the TWSIA requires use of the Sakai CLE in some form and other items as outlined in the TWSIA Rubric.

NOTES:        
Matt's concerned about too strong language excluding people from submitting applications for the award.. 

T&L Discussion (8-11-10)

One Possible Revision:

"The TWSIA committee defines innovation in education as a new or novel approach to teaching or learning that results in a transformative educational experience for students.
 
Innovation occurs by design through excellence in teaching by using methods, practices, and techniques, often beyond the use of a new tool or technology, and beyond normal pedagogical best-practices.
 
It is the use of "innovation" that leads to greater student engagement and interest, a deeper level of understanding and a lasting change in perception of an issue or topic. The innovative technique may not be new in the world, but its implementation may be new to you (to the instructor, instructional designer, etc) and your student's ability to achieve academic excellence."
 
*note that eligibility for the TWSIA requires use of the Sakai CLE in some form and other items as outlined in the TWSIA Rubric.

----

Discussion points that were raised:

All teaching and learning should be transformative.

Innovation simply means new. 

Perhaps insert the word "novel" to indicate it should be something new.

 Notes from EtherPad:

Roger Henry: to david's point, how about we bring in some of the past winners and engage them on this discussion?  (David Goodrum suggested having someone like Michael Feldstein take a look at it)
Lynn Ward: i like the wordin of he definition or he qualities you are looking for in the nominees--just not sure it natches up to the word innovation
Lynn Ward: yes, O'd like to see the word excellence in the title
Lynn Ward: innovation and excellence
Robin Hill: Or maybe "progressive"..
Robin Hill: "A novel or progressive transformation of the educational experience"

From Ken Romeo via email:
I didn't comment on the call today, but I just wanted to add my 2 cents on a couple points:
One of the key arguments I have to overcome when talking about Sakai is that it is way behind ?everything else on the web right now.  Hopefully that will change when we get to Sakai3, but I always ?thought that one purpose that the award was supposed to serve is to show how people could do ?innovative things with the limited set of tools currently available.  This is, of course, what most ?teaching is all about, especially teaching with technology:  we can all imagine some Minority Report / ?Star Trek interface, but all we have is a clunky old WindowsXP machine.  Good teaching includes, but is ?not limited to, an approach with seeks to do more with the available materials.  A course may be ?innovative in how the instructor deals with problems, how the schedule is tweaked to accomplish ?certain goals, etc., but if we want to talk about Sakai, I do think we need to really focus on things that ?have not necessarily been done yet.  Again, I will offer my impression of this year's winners:  first and ?second place were kind of underwhelming because, even though they showed great work with ?students, I didn't really see anything that hadn't been done in Sakai by 100 other teachers.  They might have appealed to someone who was new to Sakai, but to anyone who has used it for a class, there was not much that was new.  The ?honorable mentions, however, broke out of the site model and allowed students from other classes ?to interact - a lot like what we are pushing in Sakai3.  I was blown away by what they did, I was inspired ?to bring their ideas to my own teaching and to try spread the ideas to the teachers I work with.  ?Those two winners seemed to be more what the award should be about.

Current version

(Version as of 8-9-10)

"The TWSIA committee defines innovation as an educational method, practice or strategy that results in a transformative educational experience for students.

Innovation occurs by design often beyond the use of a new tool or technology, through techniques that engage and challenge students, in ways that transform both the teaching and the learning experience.

It is the use of "innovation" that leads to greater student engagement and interest, a deeper level of understanding and a lasting change in perception of an issue or topic. The innovative method, practice or strategy may not be new in the world, but may be new to you (to the instructor, instructional designer, etc)."

*note that eligibility for the TWSIA requires use of the Sakai CLE in some form and other items as outlined in the TWSIA Rubric.

Communications Archive

Salwa Khan Comments

I like what you have proposed.  I would change "but in" in the second sentence to "through".

Rob Coyle Comments

This is a definition of innovation, not what we are looking for in innovation for the award specifically, that comes later. We shouldn't be defining innovation by saying it requires quantitative or qualitative data - that's for the rubric. I also am not sure the definition of innovation needs to say Sakai required. That again is for the rubric or just the qualification of the application. I also am unsure about using innovation to define innovation (ex: "not just innovation through use of a new tool or technology").
I think we are really close and I love the comments and feedback. Salwa did a knock out job with a first pass. I am going to propose the following and please push back because I will freely admit I might be wrong about my approach to this.

"The TWSIA committee defines innovation as an educational method, practice or strategy that results in a transformative educational experience for students.

Innovation occurs by design often beyond the use of a new tool or technology, but in techniques that engage and challenge students, in ways that transform both the teaching and the learning experience.

It is the use of "innovation" that leads to greater student engagement and interest, a deeper level of understanding and a lasting change in perception of an issue or topic. The innovative method, practice or strategy may not be new in the world, but may be new to you (to the instructor, instructional designer, etc)."

*note that eligibility for the TWSIA requires use of the Sakai CLE in some form and other items as outlined in the TWSIA Rubric.


Revised from Salwa on 8/4/10 (response to Amber):

I agree with your definition and think it fits with most transformative learning scholars and theory that I have read, so I think we are fairly safe in going with it.   What do others think?

We could add this thought in the third paragraph by saying: It is the use of the "innovation" that leads to greater student engagement and interest, a deeper level of understanding  and a lasting change in perception of an issue or topic.  These improved student outcomes may be demonstrated though quantitative data such as test scores over a period of time and/oron qualitative data such as student survey responses. 


Comment from Amber Evans on 8/4/10:
I like it as it stands; however, will we need to also define "transformative educational experience"?  I understand that to mean "a lasting change in perception" but it very well may mean something else to you.  Just my two-cents worth. 


Revised from Sue Roig on 8/3/10:
Mathieu, while appreciate where you are trying to go with this I am looking for and I believe the T&L group is also looking for Innovation to be defined not how to direct the entry from an instructor or designer.  That can be driven from Rubric.  My comment below, in blue to the extra verbiage .

The TWSIA committee defines innovation as an educational method, practice or strategy that is implemented in a Sakai site ( don't know if this is necessary) and that results in a transformative educational experience for students. The method, practice or strategy may not be new in the world, but may be new to you (to the instructor, instructional designer, etc).
We are looking for courses that are not just innovative through the use of a new tool or technology, but for courses that, by design, engage and challenge students, transform both the teaching and the learning experience, and are pedagogically sound. (we are defining innovation not the award or rubric this is not necessary)

Innovative practices lead to greater student engagement, interest and learning. Demonstrating these improved student outcomes based on quantitative data such as test scores over a period of time, qualitative data such as student survey responses, or student testimonials would greatly improve your chances of winning.. ( this list could go on  student testimonials, retention rates, outcomes assessment and more.  I don't think it needs to be this specific each would be included in what Salwa identifies.  Also to tell entrants what can increase their change of winning will focus on that aspect more than any other.)

To be eligible to submit your course to the award, it needs to be hosted, in total or in part, in the Sakai collaborative and learning environment. You are also encouraged to demonstrate how the use external non-Sakai tools (e.g., social networking sites, web 2.0 services, centrally hosted technologies, client software) have been integrated with Sakai to make your course better. (I would not include this paragraph at all we are defining innovation this leads the entrant to something other than what we are trying to accomplish, if it is deemed necessary to include Sakai tools and non Sakai tools we can do that in rubric.)

I am very happy with Salwa's definition I think we should keep it at just that a definition.


Revised from Mathieu on 8/3/10:

The TWSIA committee defines innovation as an educational method, practice or strategy that results in a transformative educational experience for students. The method, practice or strategy may not be new to the world, but may be new to you, your students, your institution, or your field of practice.

We are looking for courses that are not just innovative through the use of a new tool or technology, but for courses that, by design, engage and challenge students, transform both the teaching and the learning experience, and are pedagogically sound.

Innovative practices lead to greater student engagement, interest and learning. Demonstrating these improved student outcomes based on quantitative data --such as test scores over a period of time, qualitative data, such as student survey responses, or student testimonials would greatly improve your chances of winning.

To be eligible to submit your course to the award, it needs to be hosted, in total or in part, in the Sakai collaborative and learning environment. You are also encouraged to demonstrate how the use external non-Sakai tools (e.g., social networking sites, web 2.0 services, centrally hosted technologies, client software) have been integrated with Sakai to make your course better.


Below is the first draft of a definition of innovation for the TWSIA award based on our discussion on Monday 8/2 from Salwa

The TWSIA committee defines innovation as an educational method, practice or strategy that is implemented in a Sakai site and that results in a transformative educational experience for students. The method, practice or strategy may not be new in the world, but may be new to you (to the instructor, instructional designer, etc).

We are looking for courses that are not just innovative through the use of a new tool or technology, but for courses that by design engage and challenge students, courses that transform both the teaching and the learning experience.

It is the use of the innovation that leads to greater student engagement, interest and learning.  These improved student outcomes may be based on quantitative data such as test scores over a period of time or on qualitative data such as student survey responses.